Australians are being forced to wait up to nine months for their new cars (pictured, Hyundai vehicles) to be delivered due to global component shortages and the conflict in Ukraine

Toyota Australia wait times: Don’t buy a car now

Don’t buy a car NOW: Why Aussies are being forced to wait MONTHS for new vehicles to arrive – as used car prices rise

  • Australians have been waiting for vehicles for months due to shortages and conflict in Ukraine
  • 94,383 vehicles sold last month, down 6.4% from the same month last year
  • Toyota was the best-selling company last month with 22,813 ahead of Kia on 7,307

Australians are being forced to wait up to nine months for their new cars to be delivered due to global component shortages and the conflict in Ukraine.

Sales fell more than 6% in May as the sector continued to feel the effects of the COVID-19[feminine] pandemic and a shortage of microprocessors that has impacted the availability of new vehicles across the world.

The Federal Chamber of Motor Industries said 94,383 vehicles were sold in Australia last month, down 6.4% from the same month last year.

Australians are being forced to wait up to nine months for their new cars (pictured, Hyundai vehicles) to be delivered due to global component shortages and the conflict in Ukraine

Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries chief executive Tony Weber said that

Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries chief executive Tony Weber said ‘pandemic disruptions continue to impact manufacturing and the conflict in Ukraine (pictured) has disrupted the supply of vehicle components’

“The global automotive industry continues to be plagued by a shortage of microprocessor units and shipping delays,” said FCAI Managing Director Tony Weber.

“This problem is not unique to Australia. Automakers continue to report strong demand in dealer showrooms and online marketplaces.

“Pandemic disruptions continue to impact manufacturing and the conflict in Ukraine has disrupted the supply of vehicle components.”

The drop in sales in May left the market for the first five months of 2022 down 4.1% at 437,884 (pictured, Kia vehicle)

The drop in sales in May left the market for the first five months of 2022 down 4.1% at 437,884 (pictured, Kia vehicle)

“Monthly sales figures are also dependent on sea arrivals which remain uncertain.”

“We don’t expect supply chains to stabilize until these issues are resolved.”

The drop in sales in May left the market for the first five months of 2022 down 4.1% at 437,884.

Toyota was the top-selling company last month with 22,813 ahead of Kia on 7,307, Hyundai on 7,063 and Mazda on 6,474.

The Toyota Hi-Lux (pictured) was the top-selling vehicle with 5,178 sold at retail ahead of the company's RAV4 on 3,925 and the Ford Ranger on 3,751.

The Toyota Hi-Lux (pictured) was the top-selling vehicle with 5,178 sold at retail ahead of the company’s RAV4 on 3,925 and the Ford Ranger on 3,751.

The Toyota Hi-Lux was the top-selling vehicle with 5,178 sold at retail ahead of the company’s RAV4 on 3,925 and the Ford Ranger on 3,751.

Demand for electric cars remained strong with 925 cars sold for the month, taking end-May sales to 8,543, more than four times the level in the same period in 2021.

However, Tesla Model 3 sales fell sharply from 52 in April to 12 last month.

The shortage of new vehicles has driven up the price of used vehicles, as impatient buyers look for a way to get a car right away.

Four-year-old Toyota LandCruisers are now listed on Carsales with six-figure price tags.

Chris Emerson, data scientist at IAG, the NRMA’s parent company, said buyers shouldn’t overpay even with increased competition to secure cars.

“Your budget should include the maximum upfront price you’re willing to pay, as well as ongoing carrying costs,” he told Daily Mail Australia.

Datium Insights product manager Tanim Ahmed said buyers, frustrated by high demand for three-year-old LandCruisers, were looking to a four-year-old version.

“There are now more sales for older Landcruisers than for younger ones, which is probably due to these supply shortages that we are experiencing,” he told Daily Mail Australia.

“Basically, they depreciate a lot less over time than they used to.”

Average used car prices in Australia have soared 37% since the onset of Covid, according to data from Moody’s Analytics and Datium Insights.

Mr Emerson said this made it even more important for car buyers to shop around.

“Car prices and willingness to haggle can vary from dealer to dealer, so don’t be afraid to check out and visit a few dealers before making your purchase,” he said.

CommSec chief economist Craig James said the ban on overseas holiday travel has prompted wealthy Australians to invest their money in cars instead.

“Australian consumers continue to enjoy themselves,” he said.

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