An electric car driver has shared his charging station ordeal, which included parking his vehicle halfway into a disabled car spot for the cord to reach his car battery (pictured), while traveling by car from Sydney to Canberra

Electric car owner struggles to charge while driving from Sydney to Canberra in Hyundai IONIQ 5

An electric vehicle owner has shared the brutal reality of going on a roadtrip in his $72,000 car – taking a full day to drive from sydney to Canberra and back after repeatedly struggling to find places to recharge it.

A video posted on ICT Tac by user Suthocam on June 10 showed the problems of electric vehicle drivers who do not have access to the You’re here facing the supercharging network.

Suthocam detailed his charging port debacle after traveling from Sydney to Canberra and back in a Hyundai IONIQ 5 using only third-party chargers.

“The car itself is a great travel vehicle – it’s super roomy, great seats, great speakers and has a cool big sunroof,” Suthocam said.

Suthocam said the $71,900 vehicle, with an estimated range of 450km, was capable of making the trip to Canberra on a single charge, but he decided to give her a top-up which would allow him to drive the car in the city ​​once there.

His first stop was a charging station in Goulburn, 196km from Sydney, where the only available port was down.

The ChargeFox NRMA charger display informed the driver that the “station was faulty” and had not been repaired since the start of the year despite an “estimated” repair date of January 14.

Suthocam waited for a working charger to become available, then had to park halfway into a handicapped parking spot for the cord to reach his car battery – a scene he described as “just a little summary”.

An electric car driver has shared his charging station ordeal, which included parking his vehicle halfway into a disabled car spot for the cord to reach his car battery (pictured), while traveling by car from Sydney to Canberra

“Once we started again, we did it…definitely worth it,” Suthocam said.

“It was pretty in Canberra but we had to hit the road again so we had to go get chargers.”

The first charger found by the driver of the electric vehicle was in a parking lot and did not work.

Tesla wall chargers did not work with his Hyundai and other chargers that did work were often picked up by other cars.

“Finally we found a free charger (in an Ikea parking lot) in what felt like a long time, but it was very slow,” Suthocam said.

“I didn’t want to wait four hours to get 100%, so I had to find a fast charger.”

Suthocam drove to a third charging station, but to his frustration it was blocked by a gas-powered utility.

He then drove to a fourth charging port but was unable to locate it despite appearing on the car map. He found a fifth, but it was used by a Tesla.

Video posted by Suthocam showed him driving desperately trying to locate an unoccupied fast-charging station compatible with his car (pictured, a charging station blocked by a petrol vehicle)

Video posted by Suthocam showed him driving desperately trying to locate an unoccupied fast-charging station compatible with his car (pictured, a charging station blocked by a petrol vehicle)

A sixth station was found but to Suthocam’s dismay it had a similar speed to the charger in the Ikea parking lot.

“We ended up having to go back to Goulburn, load up there, and then eventually go home,” Suthocam said.

The charging port ordeal added two and a half hours to Suthocam’s round trip – a journey that typically takes six to seven hours.

The video, which he captioned “we need more tbh chargers”, has received over 190,000 views and nearly 700 comments.

“I love the idea of ​​EVs but my god I would go crazy if I had to spend 50% of my day worrying about charging just to get to and from Canberra,” one user commented.

“You convinced me to give it another 2-3 years before I consider becoming an EV,” wrote a second user.

“Same problems in the UK. Until they sort out the charging infrastructure, I’m going to stick with dinosaur juice,” said a third.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese (centre) plans to introduce an electric vehicle strategy which predicts that 89% of new car sales will be electric by 2030

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese (centre) plans to introduce an electric vehicle strategy which predicts that 89% of new car sales will be electric by 2030

The Electric Vehicle Council (the national body representing the Australian electric vehicle industry) reported an 85% increase in the number of super-fast charging stations across the country and a 29.6% increase in standard stations since August 2020.

However, drivers are hesitant to switch to plug-in cars because the national infrastructure for fast-charging ports has not kept up with demand.

In Australia, only 1.5% of cars sold are electric and plug-in hybrids, compared to 17% in the UK and 85% in Norway.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese is set to introduce policies to boost the uptake of electric vehicles, but will stop short of imposing a ban on petrol or diesel cars as part of his plan to tackle the climate change.

The Labor Party will introduce tax benefits to reduce the price of electric cars and plug-in hybrids, predicting that 89% of new car sales will be electric by 2030.

By making electric cars cheaper and more convenient, Mr Albanese hopes there will be 3.8 million on the road by 2030, with 15% of all cars on the road then being zero emissions.

Electric cars will be exempt from a 5% import duty that would reduce the cost of a $40,000 vehicle by $2,000.

The move would result in savings of up to $8,700 for a $50,000 vehicle.

The tax cuts will be introduced on July 1 this year and will be reviewed in three years.

Labor will also invest $39.3 million, topped up by the NRMA, to provide 117 fast-charging stations on highways across Australia.

This will provide charging stations at an average interval of 150km on major roads, allowing Australians to travel from Adelaide to Perth or Darwin to Broome with an electric car.

Under Labor Party policy, the cost of electric cars will be reduced and the government will invest $39.3 million to provide 117 fast-charging stations on highways across Australia (pictured, charging stock image of electric vehicles in Adelaide, South Australia)

Under Labor Party policy, the cost of electric cars will be reduced and the government will invest $39.3 million to provide 117 fast-charging stations on highways across Australia (pictured, charging stock image of electric vehicles in Adelaide, South Australia)

#Electric #car #owner #struggles #charge #driving #Sydney #Canberra #Hyundai #IONIQ

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